By: Regina Ramazzini

Researchers in Dr. Yunzhi Peter Yang’s lab have developed a 3D printing technology that can be used to form hybrid multi-material constructs incorporating a wide spectrum of materials (rigid and soft) and bioagents (such as cells and growth factors) with controlled spatial distribution across the hybrid structure.

Stanford researchers have developed a 3D printing technology (“Hybprinter”) that can be used to form hybrid multi-material constructs incorporating a wide spectrum of materials (rigid and soft) and bioagents (such as cells and growth factors) with controlled spatial distribution across the hybrid structure.  Due to its layer-by-layer manufacturing nature, Hybprinter enables the combination of cell-laden soft and hard biomaterials with a controlled spatial distribution for regenerative medicine applications. For instance, Hybprinter can be used to form connectable vascularized bone scaffolds composed of rigid, porous, osteoconductive load-bearing scaffolds and soft hydrogel vascular conduits (or channels containing soft hydrogel) with a high diffusion rate, thus eliminating the issues normally associated with surgical anastomosis of vascular grafts. The Hybprinting process also ensures high cell viability across the fabricated tissue engineering constructs.